Archive for pressure

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Making Metallic Hydrogen

Hydrogen is the simplest atom, composed of a single proton in the center and a single electron around the edge. We think of it in a natural form as a gas, but at low temperatures (-423 F) it will liquefy. Once it’s in liquid form, adding a lot of pressure (5 million atm) can force […]

Skin Suit Requirements

A Skin Suit concept was previously described here as a combination of a super-skin layer of clothing, a space suit, and an exoskeleton. In order to bring this closer to a functional reality, we need to define requirements. We can start by defining the layers that are involved: Skin components – a layer of protective […]

1627 – Boyle – bio

Robert Boyle was born in 1627 in Ireland and was known primarily as a chemist and his formulation that is called, “Boyle’s Law”. This describes the inverse relationship between the pressure and the volume of a gas. Boyle discovered that sound does not travel in the absence of air but that light does. His work […]

Superconducting Islands Amplify Photon Pressure

The ripple in space that we call a photon, or wave/particle of light, does have some mass, but it is so small that is almost zero. It normally takes millions of photons just to measure any impact at all. Joint research based in Finland shows that an island of superconductivity can amplify the ability to […]

1776 – Avogadro – bio

Amedeo Avogadro was born in 1776 in Turin, Italy and is mostly known for discovering a relationship between mass and volume of gases that is now known as “Avogadro’s Law”. This law states that equal volumes of two different gases, at equal temperature and pressure, contain an equal number of molecules. It follows that the […]

timeline of fluid mechanics

Fluid mechanics is the study of the behavior and dynamics of fluids, both at rest and in motion. In addition to liquids and metal liquids, fluid mechanics is also applied to gases (air flow in aerodynamics) and other fluids and fluid-like substances such as plasmas and plastics. Fluid mechanics can also be used in an […]

1662 – Boyle’s law

Boyle’s law describes the inverse relationship between pressure and volume in gases. In a closed system if temperature stays constant and either pressure or volume increases, the other (pressure or volume) will decrease proportionally. PRECURSOR: barometer SUCCESSOR: Robert Hooke ideal gas law