Juno Arrives at Jupiter

It has taken NASA space probe, Juno, nearly five years to reach Jupiter after traveling over 1.7 billion miles. Juno is now in orbit around Jupiter and NASA hopes to study Jupiter using images and data being relayed back to Earth. At present, it takes transmissions 48 minutes to return to Earth.

Juno spacecraft trajectory animation

– [youtube.com]

Uploaded on Jul 13, 2011
Find out more at http://missionjuno.swri.edu and http://www.nasa.gov/juno.

The Juno spacecraft is scheduled to depart from Earth in August 2011. The spacecraft travels around the Sun, to a point beyond the orbit of Mars where it fires its main engine a couple of times. These deep space maneuvers set up the Earth flyby maneuver that occurs approximately two years after launch. The Earth flyby gives Juno the boost in velocity it needs to coast all the way to Jupiter. Juno arrives at Jupiter in July 2016.

Credit: NASA/JPL/SwRI

Juno Approach Movie of Jupiter and the Galilean Moons

– [youtube.com]

Published on Jul 4, 2016
NASA’s Juno spacecraft captured a unique time-lapse movie of the Galilean satellites in motion about Jupiter. The movie begins on June 12th with Juno 10 million miles from Jupiter, and ends on June 29th, 3 million miles distant. The innermost moon is volcanic Io; next in line is the ice-crusted ocean world Europa, followed by massive Ganymede, and finally, heavily cratered Callisto. Galileo observed these moons to change position with respect to Jupiter over the course of a few nights. From this observation he realized that the moons were orbiting mighty Jupiter, a truth that forever changed humanity’s understanding of our place in the cosmos. Earth was not the center of the Universe. For the first time in history, we look upon these moons as they orbit Jupiter and share in Galileo’s revelation. This is the motion of nature’s harmony.

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