Singularity Horizon

The “Singularity” describes a future event in human history where intelligence and ability are being replicated and growing so fast that a hyperbolic curve is created where there is one general growth rate before the singularity and a completely different growth rate after the event. The turning point, where the growth rate changes dramatically, can be considered as an event threshold or event horizon.

The language and term, “singularity” is borrowed from the science of black holes where an event horizon is created at the point where particle of light can no longer escape the gravity well. Near the edges of a black hole singularity, matter of all types is being overwhelmed and shredded by the extreme gravitational field and broken down into basic components. The extreme conditions beyond the event horizon make it difficult to extrapolate what may happen there beyond the observation that as the gravitational force steadily increases, the normal rules of physics become stretched beyond usability.

The “intelligence singularity” is an analogy to the astronomical phenomenon and will not follow exactly the same rules or progression. But it does seem that what is beyond the rapid increase in the curve (event horizon) is also beyond current human comprehension. While we might be able to communicate with ants on their level of understanding (with some level of effort on our part), it is unlikely that they can understand much about us, or communicate anything of great interest to us. This forms an intelligence singularity horizon-like point in the growth curve where it is bent so sharply that understanding what is beyond that point becomes difficult and communications improbable.

As we approach the singularity, we can expect it will be difficult to predict or understand what is coming beyond the horizon. We can also expect the same kind of limiting horizon when establishing communications with some form of higher intelligence other than our own future.

SEE ALSO:
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