CERN Detects a Pentaquark

Quarks are the pieces that combine to make protons and neutrons and other composite components known as hadrons. There are two main “families” of hadrons, categorized by how the quarks combine. Baryons, such as protons and neutrons, are composed of three quarks. Mesons are composed of a quark and an anti-quark, and are involved in short-lived transfers of energy. But there are also less “regular” combinations of quarks that are categorized as “exotic”.

Since quarks were first postulated in 1964 (by Gell Mann and Zweig), many exotic combinations have been predicted but not found. One such configuration, composed of four quarks and one anti-quark was named the “pentaquark” in 1987 by Harry Lipkin, even though it had never been actually detected. Now, CERN thinks they have detected evidence of a pentaquark.

Large Hadron Collider discovers new pentaquark particle – [bbc.com]

Scientists at the Large Hadron Collider have announced the discovery of a new particle called the pentaquark.

It was first predicted to exist in the 1960s but, much like the Higgs boson particle before it, the pentaquark eluded science for decades until its detection at the LHC.

The discovery, which amounts to a new form of matter, was made by the Hadron Collider’s LHCb experiment.

The findings have been submitted to the journal Physical Review Letters.

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