UAV/Drones Tending Crops

Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV), aka drones, are being used to monitor agricultural crops and larger drones can deliver water, fertilizer and pesticides with precision. They tend to be more cost effective than conventional crop spraying aircraft with pilots.

VIDEO – Using cutting-edge technology to improve farming – unmanned aerial vehicles – [bbc.co.uk]

Unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) spyplanes are now being used on some farms to increase farming efficiency and reduce fertiliser costs. A farmer explains how the UAV works, introducing the concept of precision agriculture.

Drones Hit New Turf: U.S. Farmland – [wsj.com]

Farmers are starting to investigate the use of drones for a decidedly nonmilitary purpose: monitoring crops and spraying pesticides.

As the spring growing season unfolds, universities already are working with agricultural groups to experiment with different types of unmanned aircraft outfitted with sensors and other technologies to measure and protect crop health.

Oregon State University plans to use the unmanned vehicles to monitor the school’s potato crop and those of a commercial potato grower. Both crops, located near Hermiston, Ore., are expected to sprout in coming weeks. The university last month ran its first test-flight.

Drone Boosters Say Farmers, Not Cops, Are the Biggest U.S. Robot Market – [wired.com]

When the flying robots that loiter in Afghanistan’s and Yemen’s airspace come home, they won’t just be headed for the local police station. They might prefer a pastoral existence of spraying crops, scanning soil patterns and other features of America’s farms.

No, Predators and Reapers aren’t going to scan large swaths of vegetation for suspected militants. And there’s tremendous interest from state and local law enforcement in drones as surveillance tools. But to Chris Mailey, a vice president with the drone promotion organization known as AUVSI, the cop shops represent short money. “Agriculture,” Mailey tells Danger Room, “is gonna be the big market.”

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