Robot Skin Sensors

Tactile sensors that emulate the information input we get from our skin can give robots more responsive interaction abilities. We tend to focus on visual and audio inputs and often forget that we constantly use our sense of pressure in a variety of forms, as well as temperature, smell and others. Pressure measurements record not just contact but strength of contact, direction of contact, shearing action and vibration. Think of how important these are in any athletic endeavor.

Hexagonal plate skin gives robots sense of touch – [gizmag.com]

Providing robots with sensory inputs is one of the keys to the development of more capable and useful machines. Sight and hearing are the most common senses bestowed upon our mechanical friends (perhaps soon to be foes?), but even taste and smell have got a look in. With the sense of touch so important to human beings, there have also been a number of efforts to give robots the sense of touch so they can better navigate and interact with their environments. The latest attempt to create a touchy feely robot comes from the Technical University Munich (TUM) where researchers have produced small hexagonal plates, which when joined together, form a sensitive skin.

Scientists develop sensitive skin for robots – [mytum.de]

Robots will soon be able to feel heat or gentle touching on their surfaces. Researchers of the Excellence Cluster CoTeSys at the Technical University Munich (Technische Universität München, TUM) are now producing small hexagonal plates which when joined together form a sensitive skin for “machines with brains.” This will not only help robots to better navigate in their environments, it will also enable robot self-perception for the first time. A single robotic arm has already been partially equipped with sensors and proves that the concept works.

Robot Skin Uses Hexagonal Sensors – [technovelgy.com]

Tactile sensors for robots are under development at the University of Munich. The intent is to supplement the information that a robot can gather through cameras, scanners and gripping hands. Take a look at the video provided below to see how these hexagonal tactile sensors can be used to shape the behavior of robots.

SEE ALSO:
Sensitive Synthetic Skin
Skintronics
TF Skin
Drexler Spacesuit
Electronic Textiles
Body Sensors

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