Single Atom Transistor

While single atom transistors have been created previously, they were positioned with somewhat random locations, making it difficult to find one that was actually useful. A team from the University of New South Wales in Australia has been able to locate a single atom of phosphorus with near atomic precision. The silicon substrate the atom is placed in also has visible markers etched into it so that metal contacts can be attached.

Single-atom transistor is “perfect” – [unsw.edu]

In a remarkable feat of micro-engineering, UNSW physicists have created a working transistor consisting of a single atom placed precisely in a silicon crystal.

The tiny electronic device, described today in a paper published in the journal Nature Nanotechnology, uses as its active component an individual phosphorus atom patterned between atomic-scale electrodes and electrostatic control gates.

This unprecedented atomic accuracy may yield the elementary building block for a future quantum computer with unparalleled computational efficiency.

One and done: Single-atom transistor is end of Moore’s Law; may be beginning of quantum computing – [purdue.edu]

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. – The smallest transistor ever built – in fact, the smallest transistor that can be built – has been created using a single phosphorous atom by an international team of researchers at the University of New South Wales, Purdue University and the University of Melbourne.

A controllable transistor engineered from a single phosphorus atom has been developed by researchers at the University of New South Wales, Purdue University and the University of Melbourne. The atom, shown here in the center of an image from a computer model, sits in a channel in a silicon crystal. The atomic-sized transistor and wires might allow researchers to control gated qubits of information in future quantum computers. (Purdue University image)

TINY TRANSISTOR – [youtube.com]

SEE ALSO:
Nanowires
Memristor
Moore’s Law
Plasmonics
1947 – transistor

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