Graphene

Graphene is a flat sheet of carbon atoms packed into a honeycomb like structure that is only one atom thick. It has great ability to conduct electricity, leading to anticipation that it may have a wide range of application in electronics.

Wikipedia – Graphene – [wikipedia.org]

Graphene is a one-atom-thick planar sheet of sp2-bonded carbon atoms that are densely packed in a honeycomb crystal lattice. It can be visualized as an atomic-scale chicken wire made of carbon atoms and their bonds. The name comes from graphite + -ene; graphite itself consists of many graphene sheets stacked together.


Surprising graphene
– [eurekalert.org]

graphene structure

graphene structure

One interesting consequence of this unique band structure is that the electrons in graphene are “sort of free,” Li says. Unlike electrons in other materials, the electrons in graphene move ballistically — without collisions — over great distances, even at room temperature. As a result, the ability of the electrons in graphene to conduct electrical current is 10 to 100 times greater than those in a normal semiconductor like silicon at room temperature. This makes graphene a very promising candidate for future electronic applications.

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