tales of things

Things continue to become more connected. Eventually, most synthetic objects we encounter will have electronics in them that allow us to communicate with them in at least a passive monitoring mode. Until then, the small steps leading up to that point include; static printed tags and rfid chips that can contain more information than a printed tag. For right now, the easiest way to begin cataloguing and tracking objects is with printed bar codes.


Project explores the ‘internet of things’
– [physorg.com]

Objects are tagged using RFID tags and QR Codes, which are used in products such as the Oyster Card and on consumer goods.

This code can be read by taking a photograph from a mobile phone or webcam, linking the object back to its entry on the website.

The tags will enable future generations to have a greater understanding of the object’s past and offer a new way of preserving social history.

tales of things

Connect Anything with Any Media, Anywhere!
Wouldn’t it be great to link any object directly to a ‘video memory’ or an article of text describing its history or background? Tales of Things allows just that with a quick and easy way to link any media to any object via small printable tags known as QR codes. How about tagging your old antique clock, a building, or perhaps that object you’re about to put on eBay.

(from) About Tales of Things
The Tales of Things site is located within the emerging technical and cultural phenomenon known as ‘The Internet of Things’. The term is attributed to the Auto-ID research group at MIT in 1999, and was explored in depth by the International Telecommunication Union who published a report bearing the same name at the United Nations net summit in 2005. The term, ‘Internet of things’, refers to the technical and cultural shift that is anticipated as society moves towards a ubiquitous form of computing in which every device is ‘on’, and every device is connected in some way to the Internet. The specific reference to ‘things’ refers to the concept that every new object manufactured will also be able to part of this extended Internet, because they will have been tagged and indexed by the manufacturer during production. It is also envisaged that consumers will have the ability to ‘read’ the tags through the use of mobile ‘readers’ and use the information connected to the object, to inform their purchase, use and disposal of an object.

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