GPS Without Satellites

Current GPS systems rely on radio signals from satellites to perform their location determining calculations. When the radio signal is not available, the system cannot work. Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) gyroscopes work like a tiny Foucault pendulum but with a vibrating element that can detect rotational changes. These small gyroscopes and accelerometors form the core of positional sensors that we use every day in our smartphones, tablets, game controllers and more. Put enough of them together and provide a valid starting position and they have the ability to track position and movement and plot it against a map.

When GPS fails, this speck of an electronic device could step in – [phys.org]

In a pellet of glass the size of an apple seed, University of Michigan engineering researchers have packed seven devices that together could potentially provide navigation in the absence of the satellite-based Global Positioning System

SEE ALSO:
MEMS Gyroscopes
Navigation: Clocks and Compasses
1817 – gyroscope
1819 – Foucault – bio

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