Human Immortality

For some time, we have been aware of our lengthening average lifespan or life expectancy. In the last 100 years, average life expectancy has almost doubled from 30-45 to 67. If it doubles again in the next 100 years, it will reach 130. However, the rate of increase has not been linear, it is an acceleration curve and continues to grow faster. If this trend continues, in the next hundred years, it could be approaching a 1,000 year average lifespan.

The article below suggested (in 2007) that people “40 years or younger can expect to live for centuries” and that the first human to live 1,000 years is already alive today. Assuming that the 1,000 year old is an infant, that still projects a steep increase in the difference for average lifespan between the 40 year old and the infant. If that trend does anything but reverse itself, the 1,000 year old will also have a chance at immortality. Today’s infant is born with a life expectancy of about 80 years, but by the time they are approaching 80, the average life expectancy may have grown to 500 years or more. And by the time they have lived another 80 years, the life expectancy could be “indefinite”.

The First Person Who Will Live to Be 1000 Is Alive Right Now! – [blisstree.com]

According to the latest immortality research (oh, it is a field), the possibility of a person making it to their first millennium is not only possible – it’s almost guaranteed that such a person is already alive right now. Of course, philosophical debates are raging, but everyone agrees that perhaps something more reasonable – say, five additional years on the old lifespan – would be totally acceptable. But according to Aubrey de Grey, the spokesperson for the anti-aging movement, the moral debates are futile: “Whether they realise it or not, barring accidents and suicide, most people now 40 years or younger can expect to live for centuries.”

Hans Rosling’s 200 Countries, 200 Years, 4 Minutes – The Joy of Stats – BBC Four – [youtube.com]

BBC | Nov 26, 2010 |
More about this programme: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00wgq0l
Hans Rosling’s famous lectures combine enormous quantities of public data with a sport’s commentator’s style to reveal the story of the world’s past, present and future development. Now he explores stats in a way he has never done before – using augmented reality animation. In this spectacular section of ‘The Joy of Stats’ he tells the story of the world in 200 countries over 200 years using 120,000 numbers – in just four minutes. Plotting life expectancy against income for every country since 1810, Hans shows how the world we live in is radically different from the world most of us imagine.

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