Leap Motion Gesture Control

Leap Motion is a small and cheap gesture control interface that plugs into a USB port and allows you to use hand and finger movements to manipulate objects on a computing device. Anticipated release price is $70 and release date around the end of 2012.

A look inside Leap Motion, the 3D gesture control that’s like Kinect on steroids – [theverge.com]

Leap Motion’s not the household name Kinect is, but it should be — the company’s motion-tracking system is more powerful, more accurate, smaller, cheaper, and just more impressive.

[follow the link above to theverge.com for an amazing demo video]

The Leap uses a number of camera sensors to map out a workspace of sorts — it’s a 3D space in which you operate as you normally would, with almost none of the Kinect’s angle and distance restrictions. Currently the Leap uses VGA camera sensors, and the workspace is about three cubic feet; Holz told us that bigger, better sensors are the only thing required to make that number more like thirty feet, or three hundred. Leap’s device tracks all movement inside its force field, and is remarkably accurate, down to 0.01mm. It tracks your fingers individually, and knows the difference between your fingers and the pencil you’re holding between two of them.

The Most Important New Technology Since the Smartphone Arrives December 2012 – [technologyreview.com]

By now, many of us are aware of the Leap Motion, a small, $70 gesture control system that simply plugs into any computer and, apparently, just works. If you’ve seen the gesture interfaces in Minority Report, you know what it does. More importantly, if you’re familiar with the touch modality — and at this point, most of us are — the interface is entirely intuitive. It’s touch, except it happens in the space in front of the screen, so you don’t have to cover your window into your tech with all those unsightly smudges.

LEAP – [leapmotion.com]

Say goodbye to your mouse and keyboard.

Leap represents an entirely new way to interact with your computers. It’s more accurate than a mouse, as reliable as a keyboard and more sensitive than a touchscreen. For the first time, you can control a computer in three dimensions with your natural hand and finger movements.

This isn’t a game system that roughly maps your hand movements. The Leap technology is 200 times more accurate than anything else on the market — at any price point. Just about the size of a flash drive, the Leap can distinguish your individual fingers and track your movements down to a 1/100th of a millimeter.

This is like day one of the mouse. Except, no one needs an instruction manual for their hands.

SEE ALSO:
Gesture Sensing Uses Sound
Touche Object Sensing

Comments are closed.