Haptic Clothing

Haptic technology is a way of providing tactile sensory input or feedback to enhance an experience. It is often integrated with virtual environments or augmented reality technologies. A simple form is the way game controllers vibrate to create a sensation connected with an event in the game.

Haptics are being integrated into many areas besides games and entertainment, including: surgery, military applications, telecommunications, art, robotics and a wide variety of training simulations. When haptic clothing is integrated with gesture recognition, it will create a new user interface paradigm.

Haptic Shoe For The Blind – [technologyreview.in]

Imagine walking down to the nearest grocery shop or a bus stop with your eyes blindfolded and you’ll probably get an idea how tricky outdoor navigation for the visually impaired can be.

Sensitive towards the needs of the visually impaired people, Anirudh Sharma, 24, a young researcher at Hewlett-Packard Labs in Bangalore, worked over several nights to design a shoe for the blind. Unlike other existing aids that are available in the market for people with limited or no vision, this haptic shoe is simple and unobtrusive in design, uses low-cost readily available components, and provides tactile feedback to assist the visually impaired in their day-to-day outdoor navigation tasks.

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All that the user requires is a Le Chal shoe and a mobile phone with global positioning system (GPS). Once the user sets a destination on the phone before starting the journey, the Bluetooth communication between the shoe and phone does the rest. The phone fetches turn-by-turn Google maps data in the background and keeps updating the user with haptic feedback about the direction the user needs to turn to.

Conception and development of a natural user interface for a gesture recognition suit – [youtube.com]

TIKL: Development of a Wearable Vibrotactile Feedback Suit for Improved Human Motor Learning – [mit.edu]

Abstract— When humans learn a new motor skill from a teacher, they learn using multiple channels. They receive high level information aurally about the skill, visual information about how another performs the skill, and at times, tactile information from the teacher’s physical guidance. This research proposes a novel approach where the student receives real-time tactile feedback, simultaneously over all joints, delivered through a wearable robotic system. This tactile feedback can supplement the visual or auditory feedback from the teacher. Our results using a 5-DOF robotic suit show a 27% improvement in accuracy while performing the target motion, and an accelerated learning rate of up to 23%. We report both of these results with high statistical significance (p ≤ 0.01). This research is intended for use in a diverse set of applications including sports training, motor rehabilitation after neurological damage, dance, postural retraining for health, and many others. We call this system TIKL: Tactile Interaction for Kinesthetic Learning.

SEE ALSO:
AR Haptic Floor Tiles
Robot Skin Sensors
TF Skin

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