AR Displays

Augmented reality displays can be delivered in as many different ways as data can be displayed. Displays that are projected onto a surface, or “heads-up” style displays on see through screens or glasses or contact lenses, and even display information that is projected onto the retina of the eyeball are all possible.

Future of the Screen: Terminator-Style Augmented-Reality Glasses – [wired.com]

The concept was that tiny, ultra-low-power lasers could paint an image onto the human retina by scanning across it at high speed, essentially treating it as a tiny TV screen. If you could assemble a set of microscopic red, blue and green lasers, stick them where they could project onto your eyes, and hook them up to a computer, you could still see whatever you’d normally see, but with three-dimensional, full-color displays of additional information or imagery overlaid on the visible world—an effect called “augmented reality.”

Brother Develops Spectacle-type Wearable Retinal Imaging Display – [brother.com]

RID is an image projection technology that focuses light, of an intensity harmless to the eyes, onto the retina and then moves the light at high speed to create afterimages. Images projected onto the retina appear as if they existed in front of the user.

Features of Brother’s RID
1. The transparent display enables users to see RID images placed in the visual field.
2. Users can view private images and confidential data away from being viewed by others.
3. Even though the product is a small, spectacle-type wearable display, the images appear as if on a virtual large screen.

Augmented Reality in a Contact Lens – [spectrum.ieee.org]

These visions (if I may) might seem far-fetched, but a contact lens with simple built-in electronics is already within reach; in fact, my students and I are already producing such devices in small numbers in my laboratory at the University of Washington, in Seattle [see sidebar, “A Twinkle in the Eye”]. These lenses don’t give us the vision of an eagle or the benefit of running subtitles on our surroundings yet. But we have built a lens with one LED, which we’ve powered wirelessly with RF. What we’ve done so far barely hints at what will soon be possible with this technology.

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