1930 – Cooper – bio

Leon Cooper was born in 1930 in New York, USA. He is most known for discovering how electrons pair together, creating a state of less resistance, known as superconductivity. These are now called, “Cooper pairs”. Bardeen, Cooper, and Schrieffer, built on this concept to create a theory of superconductivity in 1957. The three of them together were awarded the 1972 Nobel prize for this work.

A phonon is a quasiparticle, meaning it is a composite wave that acts like a particle. A wave of vibration through a lattice of atoms conducts thermal and electrical energy as though it is a particle. Electrons do not easily pair because of their similar negative electrical charge. But two electrons can become paired, using the positive electrical charge of the phonon wave as an intermediary. The result is the Cooper pair, which allows two electrons to move with little electrical resistance from the surrounding fields.

PRECURSOR:
1642 – Newton
1737 – Galvani
1745 – Volta
1777 – Oersted
1791 – Faraday
1805 – Hamilton
1818 – Joule
1824 – Thomson
1831 – Maxwell
1842 – Dewar
1842 – Linde
1849 – Fleming
1853 – Onnes
1854 – Hampson
1856 – Tesla

CONCURRENT:
1887 – Schrodinger
1909 – Bogolyubov
1918 – Feynman
1929 – Gor’kov
1940 – Josephson

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